Pediatric ENT

Our goal is to provide the highest quality of care with patient-centered treatment for patients of all ages. Our caring team of experts treat a full range of ENT issues for infants, children, and teens with the utmost attention to detail, compassion, and concern. We will partner with you to create a custom treatment plan for your child’s health and well-being.

Our specialized team has comprehensive, extensive expertise in the medical and surgical treatment of pediatric ear, nose, and throat issues. Some of the most common occurring ENT health issues are hearing loss and speech delay due to ear infections, chronic ear or tonsil infections, and snoring/sleep apnea/difficulty breathing due to tonsils or adenoids enlargement.

Pediatric surgical treatment

The three procedures described below are common treatments for children suffering with ENT issues that affect their quality of life.

  • Tympanostomy Tubes - Commonly called ear tubes, these tiny tubes are placed in the eardrum to drain fluid buildup and balance air pressure that may cause hearing loss or frequent ear infection.
  • Tonsillectomy - The removal of the tonsils located in the back of the throat, behind and above the tongue. Tonsillectomy may be performed if enlarged tonsils make it difficult to breathe of if tonsils are often infected (tonsillitis).
  • Adenoidectomy - Removing adenoids, tissue located behind the nose and upper throat near the ear passage. When enlarged, adenoid tissue can obstruct breathing or cause ear infections.

Preparing for pediatric ENT surgery:

  • Don’t let your child eat or drink anything after midnight the night before surgery. This includes gum and water.
  • If your child takes prescribed or over the counter medication, ask the doctor about taking them before surgery.
  • Bathe your child and remove any jewelry, hair clips, and earrings.
  • Dress them comfortably.
  • Bring insurance cards, a list of your child’s medications, and medical test results.
  • Feel free to bring a toy or blanket to the surgery center.

What to expect

  • Your child will be given a sleep inducing gas through a mask by a trained anesthesia specialist.
  • With certain procedures, an IV for medication may be placed after your child is asleep.
  • You will see your child soon after surgery.
  • Most likely you will be able to take your child home the morning or afternoon of surgery.
  • A nurse will discuss post-op instructions with you and answer any questions.
  • Your child may still feel some nausea or drowsiness after leaving the surgery center.
  • Medication may be prescribed by the doctor and should be used as directed. Avoid medicines that Ibuprofen, Aspirin, or Naproxen (Aleve).

Post-op care

  • After tympanostomy tubes:
    Tube insertion is the most commonly performed ear operation and is extremely safe and effective. Ear drops may be given for a few days following the procedure. Tubes usually remain in place for 9 - 18 months and hearing improvement is usually immediate after fluid has been removed.
  • After a tonsillectomy:
    Removing tonsils and adenoids are frequently performed throat operations and are safe and effective for resolving breathing obstruction and ear or throat infections. Have cold drinks, soft foods, and cold desserts to soothe your child’s throat, help them get enough fluid, and help with healing. Discomfort, slight fever, white patches, temporary odor, and slight bleeding in the first week may occur. It is normal to miss school until their follow up appointment 10 days after surgery.

Dos & Don'ts

DO

  • Soft drinks
  • Popsicles
  • Mild, non-acidic juices
  • Applesauce
  • Scrambled eggs
  • Noodle soup and pasta
  • Mashed foods
  • Gelatin
  • Ice cream
  • Pudding

DON'T

  • Citrus or fresh fruit or fruit juices
  • Hot or spicy foods
  • Rough foods like toast, crackers, and chips
  • Use a straw